Lenses, Embroidery & Distressed Denim

Until now, we have been using the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4G lens for the photos on Loops & Layers. Although we have no issues whatsoever with the outcome of the photos, the 50mm lens possesses a slightly longer focal length so in order to capture a good proportion of the background to the outfit, there has to be a greater distance between the subject (me!) and the photographer, which, in London, can sometimes prove to be a struggle without ending up in the middle of a busy road!

For this reason, we decided to experiment with the Nikkor 16-35mm f/4G lens for the photos in this post and after comparing this set of photos against the photos in my previous posts, I much prefer the end product captured with the 50mm lens. As the 50mm has a shallower depth of field, the increased blur created in the background of the image is less distracting, allowing for more emphasis on the outfit and its details in focus. The 16-35mm lens was originally purchased to use as a β€˜holiday’ lens, mainly for landscape photography and it’s an amazing lens for that purpose but for outfit photos, we’ll be sticking to the 50mm until we discover an alternative (without breaking the bank!). Any suggestions are welcome. πŸ™‚

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Moving on, I have a very casual outfit on for today’s post. A cropped t-shirt and ripped jeggings! I can already imagine mixing and matching these two basic pieces with other pieces in the wardrobe to create new looks.

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The combination of the delicate embroidery on the top and the rough distressed details on the jeggings gives the look a β€˜streetstyle’ vibe for a day when you want to look like you tried, without trying. πŸ˜›

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– Outfit details –

top | Topshop
bottoms | American Eagle
shoes | Converse
cardigan | Zara


As always, thank you so much for stopping by and I hope you’ve had a good week so far!

~Ghim

6 thoughts on “Lenses, Embroidery & Distressed Denim

Add yours

  1. You don’t mention your camera, but I assume its a full frame. It’s difficult to beat the 50 f/1.4 and even the 16-35 is an awesome lens for its use, it doesn’t sound to be what you are looking for. I would look for something like a 24-70 f/2.8. Typical work horse lens for full frame. If the Nikon (Nikkor) it too expensive, look for Tamron with VC (Vibration Control), or maybe the Nikkor 24-120 f/4 VR. Both can be found used for a reasonable price. Or maybe a short telephoto prime could be an alternative too, like an 85? Tamron makes a 85 f/1.8 with VC that are extremely sharp. If you had enough room, I think you would love a 70-200 f/2.8 VR or VC, they make very creamy background blur. Ops, there I’ve recommended everything from 24 to 200mm in the same answer… πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow! Thank you SO much for the recommendations! Yes, you are correct in assuming we use a full frame camera πŸ™‚ I am intrigued by the 24-70 f/2.8 and will definitely try to get my hands on one when I get the chance.

      Thanks again for your expertise. It is very much appreciated πŸ™‚

      Like

  2. Your welcome. I like to help beginners to navigate the DSLR jungle, because its not only Nikon’s own Nikkor lenses, but also Tamron, Sigma and Tokina out of the biggest third party manufacturers. Also, I’m convinced that great photos are important, and using a good camera and lens will elevate your photos above all those who only use their phone to take photos. If you are not sure witch lenses to get, try to borrow from friends first and also save some money buying used lenses. Good luck with your blog and photos.

    Liked by 1 person

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